Photographers Reveal The Details Behind Their First Sales

Photographers Reveal The Details Behind Their First Sales

“What types of pictures are people selling through PhotoShelter?”

I get this question all the time, and my answer usually frustrates the person who asks.

“It depends on the photographer,”
I always say.

The truth is, there is no easy answer to this question. Photographers are all very different – the way they shoot, the way they market and promote themselves, the products and services they sell, and their pricing structure – are different for each individual.

In an attempt to find a less frustrating answer to this question, I emailed 26 random PhotoShelter members who had made at least 1 sale since Jan 1, 2010.

My question: Tell me the story of your first-ever PhotoShelter image sale.

Of those 26 photographers, 11 responded with useful information, 2 of them said they weren’t interested in sharing their secrets, 4 mailboxes were “currently full” and the email bounced back to me, and 9 didn’t respond at all.

The 11 brave photographers who decided to share their experiences are:
Karim Sahai

; Dean McCartney; Meridith Kohut; Norm Yip; Warren Diggles; Jerry and Marcy Monkman; Paul Sharpe; Neil Wade; Bronson Dorsey; Tyson V. Rininger; and Aaron Reed.

Their answers show that photographers are using PhotoShelter in many different ways, to market and sell many different types of products and services.
 


Karim Sahai is a photographer and feature films digital effects artist based in Wellington, New Zealand. As an avid traveler, many of Karim’s images are about the discovery of cultures and new destinations.

1) What type of sale was it?

As with most of the sales made through PhotoShelter, my very first sale was a wide format print.

2) How did the customer find you?

This sale was the result of an email marketing campaign I launched following an exhibition of a series of photographs of a photographic trip to India.

3) How did the sale go?

For this sale and others made in the same period, I simply reused and widened an email marketing list I had used to send invitations for the opening of an India photo exhibition held Wellington, New Zealand. The exhibition showcased about 80 wide format prints. The same images were made available through my PhotoShelter archive. The first client ordered and paid via Paypal. The print was processed and shipped the same day. Since the client and I live in the same city, delivery was very fast and once transferred from Paypal, the client’s payment was on my account a few days later. Setting up the PhotoShelter account to accept Paypal and credit card payments was super simple. Since I print all my images personally at home, on Canon iPrograf printers, it was also very easy to offer the same large sizes and a few other ones.

4) Were you pleased with the sale price?

I priced the India prints lower (300NZD) for a limited time. This limited time offer was made by email marketing and the resulting volume of sales during that period was very satisfactory. Some people bought several images the first time and came back for more several months later, at a different price.

5) Do you feel that you learned anything from this particular sale?

The most important thing I learned during and after this sale was that I needed to promote very specific images in my email marketing. Sometimes very different images than the ones I really like will attract buyers. It’s a very subjective thing and it takes a bit of trial and error to figure out how a print will do. Flickr and Google Analytics are a great way to find out.

Also, I found that piggybacking on specific events is a good way to facilitate sales. In the end it’s a friendlier and more informative process for buyers than a harder direct sales approach. (In the case of my India images, Diwali, the Indian new year is a good event and time to be sending out marketing emails). Two other things learned are to offer something extra and to trust buyers. Very often I get very kind emails from people who’ve seen images that appeal to them in my PhotoShelter archives. Sometimes, I can sense that they’d like to buy but are on the fence. This happens often with New Zealand buyers. Be it custom sizes or very large sizes, owning Canon wide format printers has given me the flexibility to offer something extra to print buyers. I’ve often mailed free prints to the people who send those nice email. I also send a free print to people who buy several images. In both cases, doing this has often resulted in repeat sales. Many buyers now contact me directly and ask me to select and print images for them to use as gifts or they simply want a very large print for their home or office. I’ve often shipped their prints before receiving payment and never have I had to chase anyone.

For me, a long lasting “relationship” with someone who enjoys my images is of greater value than a one off sale. Not only will it make more sense financially but the same people will be great promoters of my work in their own circle of friends.


Australian-based professional freelance photographer Dean McCartney has been shooting for magazines and commercial and Government clients for over 14 years. Along with his commercial work, he has a personal and professional interest in shooting food, people and their places and spaces.

Noodles-McCartney.jpg

1) What type of sale was it?

This image was sold as a Rights-Managed License sale and downloaded from PhotoShelter.

2) How did the customer find you?

They found my image by searching keywords [on PhotoShelter.com].

3) How did the sale go?

The whole process from start to finish went really smoothly. The buyer never would have found the shot before I started using PhotoShelter. It really avoids the need or expensive and time consuming marketing activity.

4) Were you pleased with the sale price?

Sale price was pretty good. 175.00. But more importantly the shot ended up on the National Geographic site which was great.

5) Do you feel that you learned anything from this particular sale?

I think you should always put your hi res file up and have it for sale. The image was from my old web site that used tiny files, so I had to be asked by the buyer for a hi res image. I was lucky they bothered.

Meridith Kohut is a freelance photographer based in Caracas, Venezuela. She has covered Latin America for four years, working in Mexico, Guatemala, Venezuela and Colombia. She is a graduate of the University of Texas School of Journalism, Eddie Adams Workshop XX and former first assistant to Eli Reed of Magnum Photos.

meridith-kohut.jpg 

1) What type of sale was it?

Rights-Managed license

2) How did the customer find you?

The client, a marketing firm working on a web-based, multimedia PR piece for New Balance, contacted me to license images I’d recently shot for The New York Times sports desk of the Mets’ Johan Santana during a trip to his hometown of Tovar, Venezuela for a charity event run by the Johan Santana Foundation. New Balance had recently signed Santana and needed imagery to promote their support of him as an athlete, as well as the Johan Santana Foundation. I’d sent a follow up email with a link to an expanded PhotoShelter gallery of images to the Mets after the images were off embargo with the New York Times, thanking them for the access they provided us for the editorial piece, and to let them know that the images were available for licensing should they ever have a need for them in the future. That email and PhotoShelter gallery link were passed onto New Balance when they asked the Mets for Johan Santana Foundation imagery.

3) How did the sale go?

The sale went smoothly. The New Balance representatives contacted me via email, after viewing my Johan Santana gallery. Per their request, I provided their multimedia team a private, password-protected PhotoShelter gallery of low-res watermarked photos to download and work with while editing their web-based video. We negotiated a per-image licensing fee over the phone, and then I created a final gallery, custom priced accordingly with high res photos and emailed the gallery to them. A week or so later, when I was shooting in a jungle in Guyana far from an internet connection, New Balance decided which images worked best for their project. They licensed and paid for the high-resolution images through their PS gallery, and immediately downloaded their images. I travel regularly to remote areas for editorial assignments, and I love that PhotoShelter allows me the peace of mind to know a client can be taken care of… view, license, and download the images that they need, without needing me to be involved.


4) Were you pleased with the sale price?

Yes, I was satisfied. They licensed 2 images for one-time use at $150 each (total sale, $300) as part of a web-based video. The video may be viewed here.

5) Do you feel that you learned anything from this particular sale?

This sale reminded me of the importance of following up with subjects of editorial assignments, showing appreciation for their involvement in the project, and clearly communicating with them that published images, as well as out-takes, are available for licensing. For example, if you’re shooting a travel piece, send a follow-up PhotoShelter gallery link to the managers of the hotels, restaurants and venues featured. I make several additional sales every month by doing this, that are often times more profitable than the original editorial fee. This sale is also an example of the importance of always owning the rights to your images, and having them clearly stated when negotiating contracts with your editorial clients.

Norm Yip specializes in fine art portrait photography, and is best known for his fine art photographs of Asian males. He is based in Hong Kong, and has published two photography books, ‘The Asian Male – 1.AM’, and ‘The Asian Male – 2.AM’, both featuring nude and semi-nude images of Asian men.

norm-yip-photo.jpg

1) What type of sale was it?

3 Prints, 20 x 30″, fulfilled by EZ Prints.

2) How did the customer find you?

Although I don’t know the exact way this particular found me, I do know that they are located in Japan, and that my work was found discovered to him via the PhotoShelter website. My marketing activity is a combination of setting up a Facebook group (not a Page, which is less useful in my opinion), to which I have about 2,300 members. My personal profile also has about 2,000 friends. My twitter is linked to Facebook, so it makes it easy to send out quick messages and updates, although writing directly on the Wall allows for more text and direct links when I have new material to showcase.

3) How did the sale go?

The client initially had problems making payment through Paypal. I sent an email (via the CONTACT link) to PhotoShelter and I received a detailed reply back from Farah indicating that I should disable Encrypted Payments from Paypal. Once I did that, I emailed the client and he processed the payment smoothly. I then received an email from PhotoShelter indicating that I received an order from the customer and that I had to approve/and or fulfill the order. I went into PhotoShelter and found the order needed my additional input on the file and cropping. Since the prints ordered were 20 x 30″, and my jpg files were about 15″ lengthwise, I decided to make an adjustment to my original file size, and uploaded high res jpgs with the 30″ length.

4) Were you pleased with the sale price?

I felt that these prints should not be priced like original artwork, so they are still economical to the customer. Ultimately I would love for anyone that appreciates the photography to feel free to purchase the art inexpensively. Here is the current pricing for prints in US currency (on the website it is in HK$):

4 x 6 print: $1.28
5 x 7 print: $3.20
8 x 12 print: $7.05
11 x 14 print: $10.90
12 x 18 print: $19.23
20 x 30 print: $37.18

I allow for the customer to choose from matt, glossy, or lustre finish.

5) Do you feel that you learned anything from this particular sale?

Initially, I wasn’t sure whether or not anyone would be interested in purchasing prints directly from a website, especially artwork or photography in the genre that I shoot in, but I was pleasantly surprised when I received the order. I think what is encouraging from this first order, is I somehow found someone that appreciated the work enough to buy an actual print. To photographers out there, it’s important to know what you like in your work, to know your passion, to know what makes you tick. Then read and listen to all that is out there to market your passion. There’s a great deal out there to learn and experiment with, and getting the work out there is a part of it. What I like about PhotoShelter is that it allows me to showcase my photography in an attractive way, and to also sell the images at the same time, without me having to process the image at a lab, and to also have payment transactions all via Paypal, which I have used for many years before with little trouble.


Warren Diggles specializes in Colorado photography and photography web design. He shoots a wide variety of subjects, and has developed a very effective system to market and promote his business.

warren-diggles-photo.jpg


1) What type of sale was it?

The very first sale we made through PhotoShelter was a print sale from a wedding, the order was 4 4×6 prints. The customer who bought the pictures was the florist for the wedding.

2) How did the customer find you?

Every two weeks or so I will put together an email newsletter through Vertical Response and mail it to the businesses/organizations from the last couple weeks of new shoots. Monday or Tuesday is when I send out the email and I use the PhotoShelter coupon codes to offer them a 25% discount for purchases made by Friday of the same week. They have to be given a nudge to make the purchase right away or they will put it off and maybe never buy an image. I like using Vertical Response for the emails because it allows me to track all activity from the email. Almost without fail all participants in the shoots open the email and click 1 or more of the links. Here is an example of a recent email.

3) How did the sale go?

It went very easy and smoothly, after we sent the gallery link to the bride she forwarded it on to everyone involved with the celebration. Within 1 or 2 days of sending the link we received the order from the florist. She paid with Paypal and we ok’d the print order through PhotoShelter’s order system then they were sent off to EZ Prints who then mailed the prints directly to the customer. Do not think it could have gone any more smoothly than that.

Generally we do not photograph very many weddings so this sale is a bit different than most I make through PhotoShelter. Sales that I actively market for are Personal Business Use downloads from editorial shoots we do for a local publisher. They produce two different magazines, one local business/lifestyle and the other is medical/wellness.

My agreement with the magazine is that I can market the images from the photo sessions to the participants. During the session I will let them know that the images will be made available to them soon via my website and I will send them a link to the images when they are online. I let them know that they can either download web size for free w/watermark or purchase images if this won’t meet their needs.

4) Were you pleased with the sale price?

My personal use prices are $30/500px, $60/1500px, $75/full file. The pricing I use for these personal business use sales is lower than what I would charge for a stock, reason being is that they help the magazine out by participating in a story and they sign model releases from me so I can market the images through traditional stock channels. It is always interesting to me which businesses buy the images, a lot of times it is not the ones I would have thought would make a purchase.

5) Do you feel that you learned anything from this particular sale?

Recently I signed up with Agency Access for their list service, which is an incredibly useful tool, btw. I basically use the same process to market to the agencies and publishers generated through their list creation tools. Because the time between imagery research and the actual purchase can be months I am currently trying different offers to find one that will resonate better with the agencies. The key to this type of email marketing is to call the agency/publishers that show interest in your emails and work on creating a relationship with them. I do not believe that professional picture buyers are going to buy pictures from a photographer if they do not have some sort of relationship with them. The potential risks are just too high. Agency Access has their own email newsletter service as well but I do not use it because it is significantly more expensive than Vertical Response.


Jerry and Marcy Monkman
are the people behind EcoPhotography, which specializes in distinctive adventure, nature, and travel photography. Known for their conservation work in New England’s wild places, the Monkmans have spent the last fifteen years artfully documenting the mountains, forests, and coastlines that define the region.

1) What type of sale was it?

Our first PhotoShelter sale was a 12″ x 18″ print.

2) How did the customer find you?

Web search. We had no contact with this customer, other than sending the print and a nice note. Hopefully our efforts to customize our PhotoShelter site and follow some SEO rules helped. We’ve definitely seen an uptick in this kind of sale this year due to our SEO efforts. Even so, this is not a typical sale for us. The vast majority of our sales are RM stock sales that come from customers we have cultivated for years through postcards, e-mails, phone calls and in-person presentations – I can’t emphasize enough how this is just as important (if not more important,) as building a beautiful web site and employing good SEO techniques. While our PhotoShelter archive does generate some sales just by being out there, we find it is just as valuable as a way to service existing clients and to give those we market to a place to see our work.

3) How did the sale go?

This is the kind of sale all photographers hope for. We just put the photos out there on PhotoShelter and someone who we didn’t know somehow found this one and clicked the buy button.

4) Were you pleased with the sale price?

Yes, the client just used our price ($150.00) in our pricing profile – can’t argue with that.

5) Do you feel that you learned anything from this particular sale?

We learned that playing the SEO game can definitely help. We’re employing a bunch of the ideas in PhotoShelter’s guides to SEO and Social Networking – Facebook, Twitter, Blogging, Guest Blogging, Relevant Caption and Gallery names, etc. We’ve sold more prints on-line this year than in any other previous year, and most of those print buyers were unknown to us before they clicked on that “Add to Cart” button. I would recommend all photographers read those guides and implement the recommendations they contain, but don’t rely on the on-line marketing completely. We recently had a $3500.00 RM sale through PhotoShelter from a client we have been sending post cards and e-mails to for 5 years. I doubt they would have plunked down that kind of money without having already known of our work from our past marketing efforts.


Paul Sharpe (who is also known as “Wizard of Wonders“), is a photographer and digital artist who specializes in the creation of unique artwork made from available-light photographs.

1) What type of sale was it?

My First sale was RM License for the front half page of a yellow pages company, up to 500,000 copy’s for 1 year.

I created a PS account for the customer to save them time as they did not have one and emailed them the link to download the image from on PS with their password and they paid via Paypal.

2) How did the customer find you?

I started off putting my images on Flickr when i first started photography so continued to put images their as well as on PhotoShelter, the buyer found me on Flickr and contacted me from my profile page link there through my PS email.

3) How did the sale go?

I was on location shooting on the island of Cebu in the Philippine islands at the time, so emailed the buyer that i would contact him in his time zone later that day, so i then made a cell call around 4am in the morning to contact the buyer. At first the Buyer offered me advertising dollars in their book for use of the image, but this does not make the world go round in the world of photography, the buyer then agreed to purchase the image at 100% PS advised fees which was in the 4 figure range (:

4) Were you pleased with the sale price?

I was very pleased with the sale price and i am traveling like crazy this year to get great shots in the buyers demographic area in hope of more than one image sale to the client in the upcoming year.

5) Do you feel that you learned anything from this particular sale?

Be firm and do not give in to advertising or credit only work, it is very hard to make a living as a pro photographer and wanna bees that do do this for instant gratification do not make any easier for pro’s to make a living and in turn themselves down the road.

Neil Wade is a Taipei, Taiwan-based editorial and corporate photographer. He actively blogs about his experiences in Taiwan and Asia at his travel photography blog. He gives tips and advice and covers topics such as DIY photography equipment, inspiration and life in Taiwan.

Neil-Wade-Photo.jpg

1) What type of sale was it?

My first sale through PhotoShelter was to an investment bank for a memorandum on an investment fund. It was a rights managed license that the fotoQuote software inside PhotoShelter priced perfectly.

2) How did the customer find you?

This customer found me like most of my clients do, through search engines. I’ve put a lot of time into the SEO of my PhotoShelter website and my blog and I’ve found that the hard work has paid off. Customers can now easily find me and my images and inquire about buying stock images or hiring me for an assignment. Basically, the SEO that PhotoShelter always talks about works.

3) How did the sale go?

The customer sent me an email asking about buying the image and we negotiated. After agreeing on terms and a price, I set up a private gallery for her to download. I actually wanted her to be able to download the image for free and pay me later, but I made a mistake and she had to pay with a credit card. Coincidentally, the fotoQuote software gave her the exact price that we negotiated so she just bought it with her credit card and was none-the-wiser. This transaction led me to make my first contact with PhotoShelter, and their friendly customer service helped me to figure out the problem quickly. Now, if faced with the same scenario, I know to use the very convenient “Instant Sale” option.

4) Were you pleased with the sale price?

Yes, the fotoQuote software was spot on.

5) Do you feel that you learned anything from this particular sale?

I’ve learned that if I have any problems at all, to ask the PhotoShelter customer service staff for help. They are very friendly, knowledgeable and quick to give an answer.

Bronson Dorsey is a freelance & fine art photographer based in Austin, Texas. He was trained as an architect and practiced for many years. His eye is drawn to detail, color, line, and pattern. As a result many of his images are abstracted from their context.

bronson-dorsey-photo.jpg

1) What type of sale was it?

My first sale was a Royalty-Free license was to the owner (Hensel Phelps Construction) of a new building that I shot for the architects (Haddon & Cowan) who designed it.

2) How did the customer find you?

After the shoot, I gave the marketing manager for Hensel Phelps my website URL and told her that I would put the images in a Invitation Only gallery for her to access. The marketing activity was solely my personal contact with the client.

3) How did the sale go?

Having heard nothing to the contrary from the client, I can only assume that the transaction went smoothly from her end. For me it was the acid test that the PhotoShelter e-commerce system works flawlessly. I didn’t even know that she had ordered and paid for a license until I got an email that a sale had taken place. I went online to check my bank account and was delighted to find the deposit there.

4) Were you pleased with the sale price?

The sales price met my expectations and I am totally satisfied. I’m shooting another project tomorrow and have already notified the clients that they should purchase image licenses from my website.

5) Do you feel that you learned anything from this particular sale?

Until this sale went through, I had this nagging concern that that the system might not work or might make a transaction difficult for my clients. That was misplaced anxiety. Everything worked perfectly.


Since 1989, California-based photographer Tyson V. Rininger has been covering all aspects of photography including corporate portraiture, studio imagery, motorsports, aviation and more. Currently, he is a contributing photographer for the International Council of Air Shows (ICAS) as well as a contract photographer for the Monterey Bay Aquarium.

tyson-r.jpg
Tyson V. Rininger (NOTE: Portrait of photographer used instead of the image sold, which could not be shown in this story.)

1) What type of sale was it?

Rights-Managed license

2) How did the customer find you?

This was a repeat client in need of hard to find imagery that I was in possession of.

3) How did the sale go?

The client, a printed media publication, wanted to do a story on a high-profile celebrity and needed access to imagery I had acquired of this individual over the years. Unfortunately, as is the case with many publications nowadays, they were suffering financial difficulties and had a past due balance with me from prior assignments. Rather than risk an increased past due balance, I placed the requested images into a specific gallery for them to choose from. They were then instructed that in order to obtain the images, they needed to license them online resulting in immediate payment. While the cost of writing the article still had to be added to their balance, the licensing of imagery was paid for immediately.

4) Were you pleased with the sale price?

My licensing model is set up to reflect a 20% discount. While I wish I could charge the standard rates, the industry I work in is unable to support the same fees publications like Vanity Fair and Conde Nast are accustom to. Nonetheless, both the client and I were very pleased with the transaction process and the rates asked for according to the desired image use.

5) Do you feel that you learned anything from this particular sale?

Most magazines insist on paying approximately 30 days after publication. This is not a photographer-friendly approach. After all, do you go to the grocery store insisting you’ll pay for a loaf of bread after you’ve finished eating it? Of course not. While the online licensing process opens many possibilities for the photographer, not every publication or organization has a means of paying through this procedure. But, in this instance where there is good rapport between the publication and the photographer, along with a strong desire for certain imagery, this process provided an additional solution that worked for both parties.

Aaron Reed runs a business that encompasses fine art landscape, wedding and stock photography. Aaron has had his work published in various magazines and professional publications and has worked with and licensed images with companies and web businesses such as Travel Oregon, The US Postal Service, Endeavor Capital and many others. He also operates Exposure Northwest, which provides 1 and 2-day in-the-field photography workshops in Oregon & Washington.

I0000n5gQ7qtbt4s.jpg
Aaron Reed’s first sale through PhotoShelter wasn’t an image at all. He used his PhotoShelter account to accept payments for his “Exposure Northwest” photo workshop.

1) What type of sale was it?

Shortly after my PhotoShelter website went live I was looking to branch out my photography business and launched Exposure Northwest, a schedule of in the field photography workshops in Oregon & Washington. In fact, my first official sale through the new website was a customer who signed up for our first workshop. Our workshops sold out entirely this first year and the transactions were all processed with ease through PhotoShelter.

2) How did the customer find you?

As most photographers know, it can be a challenge to reach your target customer base on a consistent basis and every little bit helps. I use a number of methods of advertising including various social networks, online advertisement, referral and word of mouth and of course all the tools PhotoShelter has built into their framework like key wording and other SEO optimization. I honestly do not know where this first customer heard about our workshops but wherever it was…it worked!

3) How did the sale go?

Because I have integrated PayPal with PhotoShelter, the sale is instant and very smooth whether I am selling workshops, prints or downloads. When a customer pays, I get the money in my account almost instantly. It is very easy to use.

4) Were you pleased with the sale price?

I was pleased with the sale price because it was the price I had set. That is the beauty of being able to create your own “products” because you can set your prices and accept what you feel is an honest fee for your work.

5) Do you feel that you learned anything from this particular sale?

One of the things I already had learned, but was reminded of with this first sale is that the easier you can make it for your customers to buy from you, the better. You only have seconds to reach them, reel them in and hold their attention long enough to share with them why they should do business with you. If this process is choppy or difficult, they are more likely to go elsewhere, even if they really like your work. PhotoShelter has done a great job of making their service useful and simple to use allowing me to offer the same level of service to my customers.

Help us continue this story: Use the comments area (below) to tell us the tale of your own first sale experience.

Want to learn more about selling more photos online? Join us for a free webinar!

How-to: Set Up Sales in Your PhotoShelter Account
Tue, Aug 31, 2010 | 4:00 PM – 4:30 PM EDT

Client Services guru Farah Visslailli, will show you how to make the most of PhotoShelter’s built-in E-commerce tools to generate additional revenue streams from your image library.

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  1. Photography by Depuhl at 4:48 pm

    Pascal Depuhl http://ww.depuhl.com runs a business in Miami that photographs people, products and places. Pascal has had his work published in various magazines and catalogs, as well as numerous websites for his local clients. His clients include Mars, Tyco, L’Oreal, Boston Proper, Frontgate, The Palms Hotel and Spa and many others. He also writes a blog http://blog.depuhl.com that talks about technology, social media and photography. http://archive.depuhl.com/package-show/PlayGround-Theatre-Summer-Camp/P0000h8QjlTPvsAE 1) What type of sale was it? One of the clients I shoot for is a local theatre company that puts on Summer Camps for kids, focusing on inner city kids. I have photographed this pro bono for the last three years. This year I was asked, if I offered the images for sale to some of the parents that may be interested. 2) How did the customer find you? During the performances of the children’s theatre plays, there was an announcement made that anyone interested in buying images, could pick up my business card and email me. 3) How did the sale go? I integrated the pay portion of my PhotoShelter account just for this shoot and was surprised at how easy the set up is, how flexible it is as well (the theatre gets the same photos for free – via password protected web download and the parents can pay in a separate public gallery). It was a very unique experience to get an email saying that an order is placed at the same time as seeing the funds show up in your paypal account. 4) Were you pleased with the sale price? Yes. I had priced downloads and prints (fulfilled through PhotoShelter’s partners) very reasonably, since this is a family friendly program. I was surprised when the first order came in for over 40 prints. 5) Do you feel that you learned anything from this particular sale? I learned how easy it is to make a sale on line and how much work PhotoShelter has put in behind the scenes to make this all but effortless on our part. I will use this service in the future.

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