13 Digital Point-and-Shoot Cameras Used by the Pros

13 Digital Point-and-Shoot Cameras Used by the Pros

About a year and a half ago, Grover put out the following question to the pro photographer community: What digital point-and-shoot camera are you using?

Knowing how fast technology changes, we figured it was time for an update. So we went back to several of the same photographers and asked them again, “What point-and-shoot camera do you use now  and in your opinion, what’s the best point-and-shoot camera?” Several of the same big-name pros like Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Brian Smith and photojournalist David Burnett gave their two-cents; we also posed the question on PhotoShelter’s Twitter and Facebook to get some fresh opinions.

Each pro also offered expert advice on their point-and-shoot photography, so there’s no shortage of techniques and gadget how-to’s in here. Given how far these cameras have come, there’s more than ever to be said about technique and style.

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And now, here’s the roundup of this year’s point-and-shoot cameras (we saved the most popular response for last). We’re also curious – what digital point-and-shoot camera are you using? Tell us in the comments. 

Nikon COOLPIX P7000

Jon Blacker

Camera:

In the past year I’ve moved on from the Canon G-Series of point-and-shoot cameras to a Nikon P7000.

Accessories or add-on’s:

I love the video capabilities of the P7000 which at 24fps, match he D7000 I own (and use exclusively for video). I shoot a lot of location portraits and can simply clamp the P7000 to a light stand and let it run, capturing behind the scenes video that I can later incorporate seamlessly into my “standard” video without any framerate compatibility issues. The only real accessory I use is a Sennheiser MKE400. This tiny shoe-mount shotgun mic plugs right into the P7000 and provides great audio. In a pinch, there have been a couple of times when I’ve done video interviews with the P7000/MKE400 combination and the results were great. I also love that it has an optical viewfinder which I use exclusively when I’m using the camera to shoot stills.

Pro advice on usage:

The camera works just as you’d expect right out of the box. Because of the small sensor size, high ISO is still an inherent issue with point-and-shoot cameras but the P7000 makes nice files up to 800, even 1600 if your exposure is bang on, and it’s quiet which is great when you’re trying to be relatively invisible.

New camera I’m dying to use:

Given the current options available, I’d likely still stick with the P7000; its replacement, the P7100 may have a couple of nice little tweaks that I may find useful on occasion (like a flip-out LCD), but the actual image capabilities and 24fps video of the P7000 are ideal for what I use this camera for.  If I were in the market for a point-and-shoot right now, I’d find another P7000.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Jon Blacker

Fred Rollison

Camera:

Nikon P7000

Accessories or add-on’s:

I don’t use any add-on’s or gadgets, but I might look at an underwater housing in the future since I’ve been surprised with the quality of the images so far.

Pro advice on usage:

 My advice would be to take some time getting used to the camera’s responsiveness especially with any action and moving subjects. I think Nikon’s P7100 is better at this though based on the reviews I’ve read. I haven’t shot much in the past using just a camera’s LCD to compose, but was surprised how easy it was even in bright sunlight and shooting a moving subject. Also, shooting raw is a big advantage even if you think you won’t need a raw file later. I want to add more personal work to my website and this a good camera to keep with me for those opportunities.

New camera I’m dying to use:

After using this camera I will take a closer look at Nikon’s new V line and its future products.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Fred Rollison

Nikon Coolpix P300

Corey Rich

Camera:

Nikon P300

Accessories or add-on’s:

None…it’s a great camera out of the box!

Pro advice on usage:

I love the fact that it’s a 24mm lens and f/1.4. Allows me to shoot in super low light. Fantastic still images and full HD video! Also the ultra small form factor allows me to carry it with me all the time.

New camera I’m dying to use:

At the moment the P300 is the camera for me. I don’t see a better camera on the market at the moment for the price point

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Corey Rich

Ricoh CX5

David Burnett

Camera:

Ricoh CX5

Accessories or add-on’s:

I don’t have any additional goodies for it.

Pro advice on usage:

The camera is great in macro, tele, and even makes reasonable 1280 video (audio lags but the images are pretty nice).

The great thing about the CX4 & CX5 is that they take 2 or 2.5 per second, and you can figure out when your moment will be…start shooting ahead a little bit, and let the moment happen on about frame 5 or 8 or 11.

New camera I’m dying to use:

I like the new Fuji 10x. But for me the main thing is shutter lag…and figuring out ahead of time, as anticipation is the key, when to fire.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by David Burnett

Leica D-LUX 4

Gunther Deichmann 

Camera:

Lecia D-LUX 4

Accessories or add-on’s:

No.

Pro advice on usage:

Take it where ever you go…a point and shoot comes in very handy, I use it a lot on planes, airports shooting from taxi windows and take it to restaurants and meetings with me. It is a perfect very light extra travel companion.

New camera I’m dying to use:

I am happy at the moment with this one, it does the job for me.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Gunther Deichmann

Fujifilm FinePix X100

Konstantin Golovchinsky

Camera:

FujiFilm FinePix X100

Accessories or add-on’s:

The only “gadget” I use is a Tamrac N45 strap, which is my favorite of all time, I have one on each of my cameras.

Pro advice on usage:

Aside from the image quality, which I’m in love with, I find the overall use of the camera a chore. The build-in automatic panorama is easy and wonderful to use. Alas the focus is slow, and frequently misses the mark so you have to refocus; forget about catching the decisive moment instantly, you have to be prepared, and prefocused on the right spot in advance, then wait and hope the action happens where you planned.

Also any function you wish to access usually means pushing many buttons and multiple menus. I still haven’t wrapped my head around how it exposes, most of my shots are under-exposed, some are over. The rear screen isn’t helpful because it shows one thing and the RAW capture is something completely different. The last issue I have is my own fault, I just can’t get used to the 35mm equivalent lens, I’d like something wider (28mm) or longer (40-50mm).

New camera I’m dying to use:

Strangely enough I’d like to try the Fuji x10 that’s due to come out any day, it has the same chip but a zoom lens and reputedly faster focus. Also when I was originally shopping for the x100, I considered the Leica X1, which I passed on because of a lack of built-in optical viewfinder. Sadly I end up using the rear screen on my Fuji 95% of the time.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Konstantin Golovchinsky

Ryan Armbrust

Camera:

FujiFilm FinePix X100

Accessories or add-on’s:

I can take this camera with a Gorilla Pod and be set. I recently took this camera, left all my “normal” gear at home, during a vacation to Seattle and Victoria BC. I could shoot everything I wanted to shoot with just this little camera!

Pro advice on usage:

The focus system can be a little slow, but if you know this, it is not a problem.

New camera I’m dying to use:

I would love to try out the new mirrorless Nikon 1 system.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Ryan Armbrust

Tony Gale

Camera:

Fuji X100

Accessories or add-on’s:

None.

Pro advice on usage:

Use the viewfinder as much as possible for additional stability.

New camera I’m dying to use:

Fuji x10 or Sony NEX-7.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Tony Gale

Sony NEX-5N

Brian Smith

Camera:

Sony NEX-5N

Accessories or add-on’s:

Sony NEX-5N Electronic Viewfinder, Sony NEXT Camera Mount Adapter LA-EA2, Sony 24mm/1.8 E-Mount Lens, Sony CZ 85/1.4, and Sony CZ 24-70/2.8.

Pro advice on usage:

For my prime-time debut photographing celebrity portraits of the X Factor Finalists with SONY NEX-5N, I passed the cameras out to all the contestants so they could see how easy it was to get great professional results with a camera small enough they can take it with them everywhere.

New camera I’m dying to use:

I’m waiting on my NEX-7 but it’s delayed by the floods in Taiwan…

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Brian Smith

Canon PowerShot G10

Tom Dymond

Camera:

Canon G10

Accessories or add-on’s:

It’s great having a hot shoe on it for dropping in a pocket, wizard on for test shots, but I also like using a 430 or 580 ex with it as well.

Pro advice on usage:

Had this camera way over 4 years now, as I just really like working with it. It travels with me everywhere. Would recommend an extra battery for it, as well as a good case or screen protector. As it’s an older camera now, the noise above 800asa is still pretty poor, so I try and shoot below that most of the the time.

New camera I’m dying to use:

I’ve heard good things about the Canon G12 but would also like a play with an Olympus Pen, and of course there always a soft spot in my heart for the Lecia M9.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Tom Dymond

Canon PowerShot G11

Blair Ball

Camera:

Canon G11

Accessories or add-on’s:

No gadgets.

Pro advice on usage:

Big fan of the SCN settings you can doing everything from Stitching, to Portrait, to Landscape, to Sunset, to Indoors, to Fireworks, to Snow, to Night. Love all these settings, which do an amazing job on white balance, highlights and colors. Sunrise and Sunsets you tend to blow out highlights, and this camera adjust for that without the use of ND filters.

New camera I’m dying to use:

The new Panasonic announced for this winter that will use twin lenses, and be 3D as well as 3D HD.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Blair Ball

Marshall Cant

Camera:

Canon G11

Accessories or add-on’s:

For the point-and-shoot cameras, I don’t have any gadgets. I carry them because it’s not always convenient to carry my “pro” camera stuff. Even though the G11, for example, isn’t really a pocket-sized camera, it’s still much easier to pack around than a DSLR.

Pro advice on usage:

This level of point-and-shoots expect that the user has some basic knowledge of camera settings. They aren’t as sophisticated in terms of “automatic scene modes” that a true high end point-and-shoot might have…so if you need a fully automated camera, then others would be better. I wanted manual control of a small camera so I chose the G11.

New camera I’m dying to use:

This could be a long list but I’ll control myself!

1) The Nikon P7100 isn’t available yet but I am really wanting to try it. The ergonomics of the G11 just don’t work. In fact I have essentially given that camera to my 13 year old daughter (a budding photographer) because the size is perfect for her hands.

2) The new Nikon mirror-less cameras. I think these have huge potential in the future.

3) Fuji X10. I tested a Fuji 100 early on (literally the first one here) and was disappointed (no adequate RAW support) But that’s the price you sometime pay for early adoption. I don’t particularly like the retro-look of the Fuji’s but hear that quality is now very good. The only negative about the 100 is the price…too much for a rangefinder (read point-and-shoot) camera.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Marshall Cant

 Scott MacDonald

Camera:

I’m using a Canon G11. Before this, I had a Canon G9.

Accessories or add-on’s:

I always bring along a three-inch tall tripod with bendy legs — it works great for a lightweight setup that I can carry on hikes or use to shoot video. Also, the underwater housings Canon makes for the G-series are inexpensive and fun for snorkeling.

Pro advice on usage:

In addition to regular point-and-shoot duties, I’ve been using it a lot as a remote camera, taking advantage of the camera’s silent shutter, small size and remote terminal to put it in places that a DSLR couldn’t go. In the photo I’ve included for this post, the camera was right above the couple’s head during their backyard wedding, getting views of the ceremony, including the kiss (you can see me shooting in the background). I mounted it with a Bogen Superclamp and triggered it with a Pocket Wizard, which I connected to the camera with a short 1/8″ mono cable and a 1/8″ to 3/32″ adapter I picked up at Radio Shack. It was barely visible and never heard.

This setup also works well to use the camera for time lapse shooting, using the same cable and the Pocket Wizard MultiMax’s intervalometer mode.

New camera I’m dying to use:

No camera manufacturer has yet made the point-and-shoot I really want: It will have a fast, fixed lens, accurate manual focusing and quick auto focusing, a huge sensor, great low-light performance, fit in my pocket and cost less than a grand. (A guy can dream, right?)

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Scott MacDonald

Canon PowerShot G12

Clark Dever

Camera:

Canon G12

Accessories or add-on’s:

Sometimes I use a LED ring light I bought for $30 on Amazon. I also use the super reliable Pocket Wizard IIs attached to always bomb-proof Vivitar 285hvs. And my favorite modifiers for the Vivitars is the Westcott Apollo.

Pro advice on usage:

The hot-shoe will only trigger the pocket wizards in single-shot mode (PW’s support was helpful, canon’s was not while trying to debug this issue). Due to the sensor size, you can’t depend on Bokeh to seperate your subject from the background. It’s best to use composition and light to highlight you subject in portraiture. The scene modes are helpful for creating fun effects, the “tilt-shift” is great for creating miniature shots.

Remember that you have the ability to shoot 720p video, it’s a create way to create quick clips to compile multi-media pieces. Utilize the movable screen to compose creative shots from hard to reach view points.

New camera I’m dying to use:

1) Fuji X-100 – I’m totally stoked to try out this camera, it came out after I bought my g12

2) Sony Alpha NEX-3A – Either of these detachable lens compact cameras seem like they would be interesting to try.

3) Samsung NX100

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Clark Dever

Canon PowerShot D10

Tamara Gentuso

Camera:

Canon D10

Accessories or add-on’s:

No add-ons or gadgets. I do occasionally use Nik Effex when I open up the images in Aperture.

Pro advice on usage:

LOVE the fact that it is water-proof and fits into my jeans pocket. Play with the no-flash feature – often makes a better photo than the flash does (especially if the light in not particularly low or if your subject is close to you) since you cannot really control the intensity of the flash.

New camera I’m dying to use:

I wouldn’t mind finding the Canon PowerShot @100 in my stocking this Christmas….

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Tamara Gentuso

Canon PowerShot S90

Michelle Lawlor

Camera:

Canon S90

Accessories or add-on’s:

I don’t use any add-on’s or gadgets, though I have lately been eyeballing a custom grip made specifically for this camera. The one gripe I do have about the camera is that it can sometimes be like holding a bar of wet soap. I always use the wrist strap… sometimes I have to hold on pretty tightly and there’s just nothing “grippy” to hold on this camera.

Pro advice on usage:

Get additional batteries! As there is no standard viewfinder, you constantly rely on the screen on the back, which is a big battery hog. I bought an off-brand battery that performs just as well as the mfr battery that came with the camera. As with any camera, the more you use it the more you will understand its strengths and weaknesses. It’s quite a capable camera in so many different light scenarios and it has allowed me to get a great image when I was without my normal full-size SLR. Take it everywhere, make photos every day and you’ll really learn what this little baby can do.

New camera I’m dying to use:

I’m very interested in exploring the micro 4/3 format. I’ve had my eye on the Panasonic Lumix GF1 for some time now. I love the idea of having a quality imagemaker in my purse at all times. But for now I’ve got the S90 and that works great for my current needs.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Michelle Lawlor

Ignacio Aronovich & Louise Chin

Camera:

We are currently using two point-and-shoots. The same old S90 we mentioned on the previous blog post, and an iPhone 4.

Accessories or add-on’s:

Not really. The only add-on is a neoprene pouch for the S90 made by Zing Designs.

Pro advice on usage:

On the S90, shoot RAW, wide is better (and brighter) than tele, find a surface or place to brace camera for best results.

New camera I’m dying to use:

We wouldn’t mind using an M9 with a 35mm.

As for point-and-shoot’s, a larger sensor on a point-and-shoot camera à la Fuji X100 (with the X10 form factor) would be welcome. The Canon S100 specs are also appealing, more so than the changes from S90 to S95, which didn’t convince us to upgrade our S90. It’s painless to skip a model or two as the improvements are mostly incremental, not quite revolutionary, in most cases.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Ignacio Aronovich & Louise Chin

Panasonic Lumix GF1

Jeremy Goldberg

Camera:

I still use a GF1 and also added an X100 for low light shots.

Accessories or add-on’s:

I use some old lenses on the GF1, no accessories on the X100 except a fast SD card.

Pro advice on usage:

Exposure is more important on the smaller cameras – less forgiving than the bigger chip DSLR’s.

New camera I’m dying to use:

I’d love to see an interchangeable lens X100 with a better menu system, or a GF1 with a leaf shutter and great high ISO. Both cameras are great, but are more complementary than competitive.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Jeremy Goldberg

Julian Anderson

Camera:

Panasonic GF1 for me.

Accessories or add-on’s:

I use the add-on viewfinder. Very useful. Plus the 2mm F1.7 lens – I’m a purist!

Pro advice on usage:

I use it on RAW 1:1 format too – I prefer square format.

New camera I’m dying to use:

I like the look of the Fuji X100 for future upgrade.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Julian Anderson

Tomas Tyner

Camera:

Panasonic Lumix GF 1

Accessories or add-on’s:

Do not really use gadgets with the camera but I have to keep an eye on the lens hood as It’s not the most secure fit. I remember in France having to go back looking for it and asking in my very basic French if anyone found a lens hood. Somebody had found it so we got reunited :-).

Pro advice on usage:

The only other thing is that the LCD screen is difficult to see in very bright conditions, though I’d guess all LCD’s are hard to see under such conditions. The flash is fine as flashes go but because it’s a pop up flash you have to watch that you do not snag it on something. The camera has also survived a fall of about 5 feet and the only thing that happened is the battery door fails to close, so it can take a fall – duct tape sorted the battery door.

New camera I’m dying to use:

I’d consider an upgrade to the new GX1 and also consider a Nikon V1 maybe, as I’ve never owned a Nikon being a Canon shooter.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Tomas Tyner

iPhone

Randy Santos

Camera:

My trusty Canon G9 died in it’s sleep as of this last blog post. I now have a Canon G11 as a point-and-shoot but I must admit my iPhone has taken over as my #1 favorite. In fact I’m somewhat obsessed with iPhonography – but obsessed in a good way – I think.

Accessories or add-on’s:

Still using my same overstimulated hyperactive brain.

Pro advice on usage:

Yes – I use Hipstamatic like everyone else – but love it! So many other cool free Apps, too many to list, but I’ll most times shoot with Hipstamatic App and run the image through another App to achieve my desired effect. Some of my current favorites this week are Iris, pixl ‘r’ matic, qbro, 100 Cameras, iQuickDoF, LemeCam, and many more.

New camera I’m dying to use:

Fuji FinePix X100.
Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Randy Santos

Daniel Houghton 

Camera:

iPhone 4s

Accessories or add-on’s:

No, just some apps like Instagram and Pano.

Pro advice on usage:

Forget that you are using a phone to shoot a picture and just use it like any other tool. After all, it’s always in your pocket.

New camera I’m dying to use:

Sigh… The Leica M9-P. I dream about this camera. It’s just so expensive…

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Daniel Houghton

Camera:

iPhone

Accessories or add-on’s:

For quite some time I was very anti the whole iphonography movement as I felt it took the skill away from creating an image as your just playing with  fancy filters to make an inanimate object look interesting in most cases. But then this ease got the better of me….I don’t use any add ons as such but occasionally would use Hipstermatic to give an image a certain look or an enhancement using Photoshop mobile.

Pro advice on usage:

Keep an eye on the lens as its can get filthy. Play around with different apps to get a look that you like and not just the standard presets. Think out the box a bit, don’t just shoot you pretty flatwhite in the morning, try and capture an interesting moment.

New camera I’m dying to use:

I have been looking at the Fujifilm X100 and the Canon S100 as an upgrade from my D-LUX. But the camera I would love to get my hands on would be of course a Leica M9P. In my eyes it would be my compact and my main camera for personal work.
Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Frazer Waller

Patrick Smith

Camera:

iPhone 4

Accessories or add-on’s:

I am shooting straight with the camera, nothing speical. I process everything in Camera+ now and publish straight to Tumblr.

Pro advice on usage:

There shouldn’t be any advice needed. See something that inspires you? Pull out your phone and snap away.

New camera I’m dying to use:

At this point, none. I’m very satisfied with my iPhone as my point-and-shoot and my Nikon D3S and other DSLR as my workhorses.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Patrick Smith

Steven Bisig

Camera:

iPhone 4

Accessories or add-on’s:

Nope, just the factory-installed software on the phone.

Pro advice on usage:

Keep the HDR function on, then keep the best of the two shots.

New camera I’m dying to use:

Nothing yet, waiting for the Nikon D4 or D800.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Steven Bisig

Adam Crowley

Camera:

Lately, I’ve really been into my iPhone4.

Accessories or add-on’s:

I don’t have the 4S, but I’ve really enjoyed the app Instagram.  I find Instagram to be not only a neat photo editing app, but a really fantastic community of photo enthusiasts.  I’ve had a lot of creative inspiration by checking out the images posted on the Instagram site.  I really recommend it to anyone with a smart phone.  That app has really made me re-examine what it means to make imagery.

For other apps for my iPhone, I’m really liking NIX’s Snapseed. Also PhotoShop Express really rocks.

Pro advice on usage:

I think that the best advise I ever got in photography was to shoot through as much bad film (files) as possible. That means to keep practicing/working on one’s own photographic eye or vision. You can’t get to success without a lot of failure, so embrace it, and shoot away!

New camera I’m dying to use:

I’m really ready to get a Canon G12, but I’m really dying to get a Fuji X100.  I love the vintage exterior look to the camera, and I’ve seen some really nice files from it.

Shot I took using this camera:

Photo by Adam Crowley

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  1. Pingback: PhotoShelter’s Blog on Pros Using Point/Shoot Cameras « fred rollison
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  4. Ian at 4:22 pm

    I recently attended a presentation at my local camera shop held by Nikon reps. It was to introduce the D3100, 5100 and 7000. Before it started I asked the sales rep for his recommendation of a Nikon point and shoot. He scoffed and said, “We’re hear to talk about real photography.” I want to thank you for this wonderful piece. Though these and other point and shoots would not replace a DSLR, I love their compactness and ease of use. I’ll always carry a p&s. Thanks again.

  5. Sam Ogden at 1:46 pm

    I use a Nikon D3s professionally. My favorite travel camera isn’t cheap but the Sony Nex5 is a brilliant camera I bought this summer for a family trip. My 14 year old daughter and I both loved using it. The RAW images are to die for. The other features including hand held panoramas, HDR and HD-1080i videos make this one camera for everything. And it still amazes me how small it is. Downside is that it doesn’t have a eye level view finder. The LED screen at arms length took some getting used to but isn’t a deal breaker by any means.

  6. Nancy de Flon at 8:08 pm

    What an interesting article! Thank you! Since some of my projects involve shooting into windows I love the discreet quality as well as the portability of my Canon G11. For an everyday “always-have-it-with-you-just-in-case,” I have the Canon S95. When you work in an area of suburban NJ where the only wildlife we haven’t seen is moose, it’s good to have some kind of little camera handy.

  7. DVDugan at 11:01 pm

    Great article. I’m glad to see I’m not the only one who keeps the old PNS around. I couldn’t live without my D3s, but I’ve been blown away by some of the stuff that comes out of my Leica V-Lux1 — the major difference between them: the ratio of great shots that come out of each (as expected: world’s apart). I suspect that sometimes the PNS does not know how to handle a situation and sort of ‘wings it’ — sometimes what it comes up with, I couldn’t replicate with my DSLR if I tried.

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  10. Rafael Marquez at 3:14 pm

    I’m glad I’m not the only yahoo that likes taking pictures with their iPhone 4. I have an old Canon A470 that used to be my “always on me camera” but my first iPhone (a 3G) replaced it fairly quickly. Most of my pictures are now taken on an iPhone 4 and I love the results.

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  15. Deirdre Ryan at 12:26 pm

    I think I’m one of the few here that has an Android phone as a point and shoot. It’s the LG G2X and it has an 8mgpxl camera and a super bright flash. I like using free apps like Retro Camera, Magic Camera, and Vignette.

    I would love to get a an Olympus Pen or the new Nikon 1 in red ;)

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  17. Doug Wilson at 5:27 pm

    I’m surprised that the Panasonic Lumix LX5 or even its predecessors were not mentioned.
    I carry my LX5 with me every day, using it frequently for stock photos and other coverage.
    On one outdoor magazine article I did a few years ago I use my LX2 to illustrate the entire article which ran the lead image photo as a page and one-half spread. I had two Nikon dSLR’s in my bag and never took them out.

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  19. AFirmin at 5:28 pm

    I’m a Nikon Pro shooter but for nearly 9 years my carry everywhere camera was a Fuji S602 Zoom. I know its not a point and shoot, its a bridge camera, but it took great, nicely saturated shots and I’ve found it difficult to replace since it passed away :-(

  20. Paul from MI at 10:01 am

    I still love my old Canon S50-it is a 5MP camera , shoots RAW, has a viewfinder, and fits in my shirt pocket It’s only big failure is shutter lag, but I use it as a vacation travel back up, not for capturing movement.

  21. Dom-Dom at 6:25 pm

    Always nice to hear advice from prophotographers. Used to love my Fuji F100, tried to find him a successor with the F600 EXR. Like the raw files but I find barreled lens distorsion a bit too much, also not impressed by image stab in low light. Likely to give my Fujis a rest and go for some affair with the Lumix ZS15 (a friend of mine bought one for his daughter… he tried it and was so delighted he kept it for him ;-))

  22. Sam at 10:34 am

    Great post will come back to it next time I’m looking at buying a camera.
    Good to see a Nikon Coolpix there. I used the S6200 during my last travels and had a great result (http://www.seepointshoot.com has some examples).
    Always find it interesting to hear about this stuff from the pro’s.

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  24. John Smith at 8:02 pm

    Oh my GOD, I came here looking for a review of a great point-and-shoot that my wife could use for an upcoming trip to Peru, and I managed to instead stumble upon the biggest pile of YUPPIE PHOTOGRAPHER SNOBS I’ve ever seen. It’s almost absurd. OMG, if someone doesn’t get a super-uber-hip-retro-cool Fuji X100 in the next three minutes, I might just self destruct. Give me a break. You aren’t professionals, you’re just self-proclaimed “experts” with varying degrees of wallet-depth. STFU…

  25. Brechin Maclean at 7:19 pm

    The Sigma DP Merrill cameras are impressive. Although they have their limitations (e.g., low-light and fast action photography) the image files are huge, sharp, and beautiful. The cameras are light and can be carried around in a large pocket!

  26. Simon at 8:09 am

    “PROFESSIONALS DO NOT use point-and-shoot cameras for their pro work. End of story.”

    Some of these people obviously have never heard of Zack Arias or Ben Lowy.

  27. Victor Reynolds at 10:03 pm

    I’m with Corey Rich. I recently purchased the Nikon P310. I use this mainly for travel, street and for appraisal work. It has the 24mm wide which suits most of my work; and it has a max aperture of f1.8.

    I also use my Droid HD as well with the ProPhoto app.

    Both are great P&S cameras for my use-especially in street photography. And both can produce great work.

  28. Peter Blake at 5:12 pm

    You can use anything you damn well want, to get the job done. A lot of clients are now asking for jobs to be shot on smartphones.

  29. Pingback: Is the Point and Shoot Camera Really Dead? | CHADJACKSONPHOTO|blog
  30. Tom Gerber at 7:45 am

    Thank you for the “report” and comments on a very interesting subject. With technology expanding at almost “Warp” speed, P&S cameras and iPhone cameras offer many advances and options thought only possible with DSLR devices just a few years (even months) ago.

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