Friday Happy Hour: Colorizing The 1930’s & 40’s

Friday Happy Hour: Colorizing The 1930’s & 40’s

For all the history buffs out there, we stumbled across the Library of Congress’ Flickr account, which features color images from the 1930’s and 40’s. We also heard exciting news featuring several PhotoShelter members, so take a look!

Colorizing the 1930’s & 40’s

Photographers have mixed feelings about colorizing historical black and white photos. But whatever your opinion on the matter might be, you can “rest easy” with these images – they’re true color images from the Library of Congress, which recently joined Flickr and uploaded some 1,600 archival photos.

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Typically we see B&W photos from the 1930’s and ’40’s, but the Library of Congress’ archive contain vivid color photos from the Great Depression through WWII captured by photographers working for the the United States Farm Security Administration and the Office of War Information. Here are a few of our favorites.

Photo by Howard R. Hollem. Lathe operator machining parts for transport planes at the Consolidated Aircraft Corporation plant, Fort Worth, Texas. 1942 Oct.

Photo by Howard R. Hollem/Lathe operator machining parts for transport planes at the Consolidated Aircraft Corporation plant, Fort Worth, Texas. 1942 Oct.

Photo by Marion Wolcott/Southern U.S. oat field

Photo by Marion Wolcott/Southern U.S. oat field, ca. 1940

Photo by Jack Delano/Tenement houses in Brockton, Massachusetts, 1940 Dec.

Photo by Jack Delano/Tenement houses in Brockton, Massachusetts, 1940 Dec.

Photo by Marion Wolcott/A cross roads store, bar, "juke joint," and gas station in the cotton plantation area, Melrose, La., 1940 June

Photo by Marion Wolcott/A cross roads store, bar, “juke joint,” and gas station in the cotton plantation area, Melrose, La., 1940 June

Nikon announces team of U.S. Ambassadors

This week Nikon announced its team of 16 Nikon Ambassadors – celebrated contemporary photographers that the company calls “some of the most talented and influential visual artists working in the business today.” We were pumped to see PhotoShelter members Corey Rich, Ami Vitale, Andrew Hancock, and Bill Frakes. Corey Rich says, “I’ve relied on Nikon cameras to help me broaden the scope of my work, stoke my creative energy, and transition from strictly a still photographer, to filmmaker, director and DP.”

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You can learn more about each photographer and his/her work (with Nikon and beyond) here.

Motorsports photographer Jamey Price featured on Pop Photo

A killer gallery from PhotoShelter member and motorsports photographer Jamey Price was recently featured on PopPhoto.com. Jamey has incredible talent in capturing the perfect moment as cars come racing down the track. He also shoots horse races, and is a jockey himself. We spoke last year about why racing photography is the king of sports photography. Here are a few images he shared.

Photo by Jamey Price

Photo by Jamey Price

Photo by Jamey Price

Photo by Jamey Price

Photo by Jamey Price

Photo by Jamey Price

Canon announces whole new slew of point-and-shoots

Canon went announcement crazy midweek to announce it’s new lineup of point-and-shoot cameras. While some pack nice features (the PowerShot G16 now has wi-fi capabilities), the blogosphere has made a good point. With the widely diminishing market for point-and-shoots, why is Canon investing so much in creating new models? Many of the specs seem geared toward the amateur/hobbyist photographer, like Zoom Framing Assist and “share to Facebook” buttons. Given the increased price tags compared to earlier models, it will be interested to see how sales go this fall. (via PetaPixel)

 

The new Canon G16

The new Canon G16

PhotoShelter CEO Andrew Fingerman talks Beam on the DIMAcast

PhotoShelter CEO Andrew Fingerman spoke with Paul Worthington of DIMAcast this week about how and why Beam – our new portfolio website platform – was developed, and talks about competitive landscape in online photo services. Take a listen here.

Photojournalists compete in an Instagram “shootout”

Photojournalists tend to be competitive by nature – they’re often tasked with shooting the same events, and he/she with the best images comes out on top. That was the inspiration behind Eric Thayer and Joshua Lott‘s Instagram shootout – two photographers photographing in the same place with their smartphones and posting images on Instagram. The first installment took place in New York City, and perhaps what’s most interesting is that the photographers were often shooting just blocks away from each other, but their images turned out drastically different. (via Lens Blog)

Left, Joshua Lott. Right, Eric Thayer

Left, Joshua Lott. Right, Eric Thayer

Left, Joshua Lott. Right, Eric Thayer

Left, Joshua Lott. Right, Eric Thayer

Left, Joshua Lott. Right, Eric Thayer

Left, Joshua Lott. Right, Eric Thayer

Frontback iPhone app lets you capture front & back view from camera

Don’t you hate it when you’re shooting something awesome in front of you, but you can capture your own reaction at the same time? Apparently there’s a need, because Frontback recently hit the market with its free iPhone app for taking  a photo with the front camera, another with the back camera, and sharing them both in a single image.

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JJ Tiziou on shooting a surprise wedding

It’s not for everyone, but JJ Tiziou’s clients Lee and Amy aren’t your average couple – the groom-to-be crafted an elaborate plan to propose to his girlfriend and get married, all in the same day! And Philadelphia-based photographer JJ Tiziou was there to capture every moment along the way. “It was quite a gamble, as he was planning to propose that morning, and then spring the surprise wedding on Amy later that afternoon,” says JJ. It all worked out, and JJ shot the 140 person wedding from start to finish. What a day!

Photo by JJ Tiziou

Photo by JJ Tiziou

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